WRVU PART OF NATION-WIDE RADIO CONSOLIDATION?

STAND UNITED, NEVER BE DIVIDED

Fellow college radio stations KTRU and KUSF are in more advanced stages of a fight for survival – both found themselves in the predicament of having no warning before having their transmitter silenced and locks to their studios changed. In both instances, student, political, and public pressure is being put on the responsible parties to undo these egregious wrongs.
This recent article in PopMatters highlights some interesting points, particularly that radio conglomerates are on the prowl – “radio conglomerates [are] actively shopping for non-commercial radio licenses”. This indicates that these transmitter licenses have value and based on this new interest to back-end of the FM dial, will continue to hold value, particularly as this area is further consolidated. Unfortunately, it also seems that the FCC are green-lighting this consolidation, but appeals are in the works for KTRU and KUSF. Only time will tell how these very unpopular decisions will affect FCC rulings. FCC, one would hope, would take pause of community station consolidation after the national disgrace that is the current state of commercial radio.
These points and others make up a cautionary tale to WRVU and to others.
Side Note: Even though KUSF is garnering most of the attention in regard to college radio consolidation issues, keep in mind that KUSF, at 34 years, is a relative baby compared to the nearly 60 year-old institution that is WRVU. but both WRVU (57 years) and KUSF (48 years) have equally long and rich histories since being chartered as student radio stations. Thanks Loren (see comment section) for the correction.
Excerpt from PopMatters:
Listeners to lauded college radio station KUSF were in for a shock on January 18, 2011, when the station’s FM broadcast abruptly turned to static during the Greek composer Vangelis’ piece 'L ‘Apocalypse des Animaux'.
At 10am, University of San Francisco (USF) shut down the transmitter for 34-year-old college radio station KUSF without warning during the middle of a volunteer DJ’s show. A band waiting to appear on the show (Pickpocket Ensemble) was sent home, the locks on the station doors were changed, and KUSF volunteers were escorted out. By 5pm, music from San Francisco’s classical station KDFC was heard emanating from KUSF’s airwaves at 90.3 FM. In their official statement, USF noted that they would be moving KUSF to an online-only format.
In the days and weeks following the sudden shutdown details have emerged about the complex deal that has resulted in Classical Public Radio Network (CPRN) taking control of KUSF’s broadcast. Owned by University of Southern California (USC) and Public Radio Capital, CPRN has filed paperwork with the FCC in order to purchase KUSF’s license and transmitter, as well as the license and transmitter for religious radio station KNDL (located north of San Francisco). With these two purchases they are starting up a classical public radio group in the San Francisco Bay Area and are airing programming from KDFC. Up until these programming changes happened, KDFC was a commercial classical station owned by radio broadcasting conglomerate Entercom. After being approached by CPRN, Entercom agreed to relinquish its KDFC brand in order to use its frequency for more lucrative commercial programming. Currently they are airing a simulcast of recently purchased rock station KUFX on KDFC’s old frequency of 102.1 FM.
[...]
In the past year, however, that’s changed as the well-publicized pending sale of Rice University station KTRU and the rumored sell-off of Vanderbilt University station WRVU have garnered national press. As a New York Times piece in December 2010 pointed out, in each of these instances universities cite funding crises and declining student interest in radio as rationale for eliminating college radio stations.
See Popmatters article by Jennifer Waits for Complete Post...
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About savewrvuradio

We want to keep WRVU 91.1 FM on the radio.
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3 Responses to WRVU PART OF NATION-WIDE RADIO CONSOLIDATION?

  1. Elitism Fighter says:

    “the national disgrace that is the current state of commercial radio.”

    Guess what, Communist homosexuals–the MAJORITY of the American public DISAGREES with you. In case you haven’t been told (and your gov’t schools haven’t taught you this), AMERICA IS A REPUBLIC, NOT A DEMOCRACY! REPUBLIC MEANS MAJORITY RULE, MINORITY LOSE! In other words, WE WIN, YOU LOSE! And we don’t want you to cram your weirdo Communist homosexual minority perversion down our throats, because this is what we’re happy with:

    TODAY’S LITE ROCK WITH LESS TALK!
    TODAY’S HOT NEW COUNTRY!
    TODAY’S HIT MUSIC AND MORE OF IT!
    GOOD TIMES, GREAT OLDIES!
    CLASSIC ROCK THAT REALLY ROCKS!
    And NEWS-TALK THAT SUPPORTS AMERICA–including RUSH LIMBAUGH, AMERICA’S ANCHORMAN! AMERICA TRUSTS RUSH! And GLENN BECK, AMERICA’S TEACHER! AMERICA LEARNS FROM GLENN!

    NOT your Rotting Scabs, Festering Boils and DJ La-Z Bum! MAJORITY RULE, MINORITY LOSE!

    And if you don’t like how we do things in America, then why don’t you GET THE HELL OUT OF MY AMERICA NOW AND GO SEE YOUR BUDDY OSAMA?

  2. ^ Yeah! Our First Troll!

  3. loren kusf says:

    KUSF began in 1963 as a campus-only AM station managed by the Associated Students of the University of San Francisco (ASUSF). In 1973, USF was offered an FM radio station by a small local Bible college that wished to discontinue its radio operations. USF accepted the offer and on April 25, 1977, KUSF became an FM station broadcasting on the 90.3 frequency.[1] The old AM station later became the student-managed KDNZ.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KUSF

    If citations are need for the above entry I recommend contacting the new “KUSF.org online” office
    http://kusf.org/about.html
    Steven Runyon, the station manager at the time of the Jan 18th shutdown, served at KUSF for over 40 years and is still employed by the University.

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